Competition Werkes Fender Eliminator Kit for the 2013 Ninja 300R

Whenever I purchase a new motorcycle, the first thing to be removed is the kite of a mud flap hanging off the rear end. It’s unsightly, ungodly and just unacceptable. My favorite thing about riding sportbikes has always been chasing tail (no pun intended) and it wouldn’t be any fun if that tail were bigger than mine, catch my drift? So naturally, that legal, DOT compliant fender has got to go. No streetfighter of mine is going to be stuck with excess plastic.

This is why we chose to install the Competition Werkes fender eliminator kit to return the tail section to the high and tight look it was meant to have before it was tainted with an awning meanwhile remaining street legal with a license plate light and turn signals. There you go California. I haven’t completely disregarded the rules. And it only took an hour to install.

Interested in getting one for yourself? They pay attention pupils because we’re about to give you a lesson in mechanic-in.

Step 1:

Make sure you have all the necessary hardware to complete the task.

The packages should contain the license plate bracket, license plate light, short stalk turn signals and all the necessary hardware to install.

The packages should contain the license plate bracket, license plate light, short stalk turn signals and all the necessary hardware to install.

Step 2:

Remove and passenger seat and flip up the tray underneath to expose the four bolts holding the mud flap assembly and three wires routed to the turn signals and license plate light. Cut these three wires with a pair of cutters and remove the bolts with a 5mm allen socket or T-handle. Pull away the stock mud flap assembly.

The bolts and wires are located just underneath this flip-up tray.

The bolts and wires are located just underneath this flip-up tray.

Cut these wires and remove bolts with a 5mm allen.

Cut these wires and remove bolts with a 5mm allen.

Here is what the 5mm allen bolts look like from the under side (just underneath the tray). They should come out fairly easily.

Here is what the 5mm allen bolts look like from the under side (just underneath the tray). They should come out fairly easily.

Step 3:

Adhere the license plate light to underside of the top of the license plate holder and route the wires up through the center of the slot.

IMG_1769

Step 4:

Take the zip tie provided in the package and loop through the center hole of the license plate holder from the back as shown.

IMG_1778

IMG_1779

Step 5:

Retrieve the two second to longest bolts from the package. I found it easier to loosely install the turn signals and turn signal brackets to the license plate holder before installing the holder to the tail section but of course, this can wait until later.

IMG_1784

IMG_1788

Step 6:

Route the wires from each turn signal through the zip tie on the back of the license plate holder and then route the wires up through the center grommet and into the tail section.

IMG_1796

IMG_1800

Step 7:

Retrieve the four longest bolts from the package along with four washers and nuts. Install license plate holder to the tail section.

I installed the bolts nuts-up (lol) in the tail and I used a 10mm T-wrench and 4mm allen to install all four nuts and bolts.

I installed the bolts nuts-up (lol) in the tail and I used a 10mm T-wrench and 4mm allen to install all four nuts and bolts.

I loved how the license plate holder had holes to slip the T-allen wrench through in order to tighten the mounting bolts. Installation would have been a pain without them. Remember! Appreciate the little things!

I loved how the license plate holder had holes to slip the T-allen wrench through in order to tighten the mounting bolts. Installation would have been a pain without them. Remember! Appreciate the little things!

Step 8:

Adjust and tighten the turn signals so they’re facing level.

IMG_1811

Step 9:

Use the splice connectors provided to connect the turn signals to the previously cut wires. Note the sleeve with the black wire and white wire is for the license plate light. It may take a few attempts to connect the turn signals correctly, however, as both wires for each side are black and it is difficult to tell which side goes to which. Don’t worry though. You can turn the key on and hit the turn signal switch to verify both sides are blinking correctly.

Tip: I used pliers to squeeze the splice connectors onto the wires due to my lack of upper body strength. Hey, work smarter not harder!

Tip: I used pliers to squeeze the splice connectors onto the wires due to my lack of upper body strength. Hey, work smarter not harder!

Step 10:

Hook up the license plate light. I had to cut the spades that were originally crimped to the wires and strip the wires to crimp new spades. I didn’t use the ones in the package because they’re a one-time, permanent-type of connector and I want to be able to unhook the running lights if I need to.

I used a set of wire crimpers to crimp on a set of automotive-style spades. You can find these at any auto parts store.

I used a set of wire crimpers to crimp on a set of automotive-style spades. You can find these at any auto parts store.

This is the end result. It takes more time, but it's worth it to have options.

This is the end result. It takes more time, but it’s worth it to have options.

Step 11:

Tuck the wires to the side so you can close the tray above them. I wrapped the wires with electrical tape and secured them to the subframe with a zip tie to clean up the install.

I wrapped the wires in electrical tape for fear that the zip tie might eventually chaff the wiring from vibrations. Call it paranoia, but better safe than sorry.

I wrapped the wires in electrical tape for fear that the zip tie might eventually chaff the wiring from vibrations. Call it paranoia, but better safe than sorry.

Step 11:

Verify operation of all lights and install the license plate with the remaining hardware from the kit.

The license plate light is pretty potent for a couple of small LED's. Kudos to Competition Werkes on the lighting.

The license plate light is pretty potent for a couple of small LED’s. Kudos to Competition Werkes on the lighting.

Stock mud flap vs. Competition Werkes fender eliminator. Yes, Comp Werkes eliminator wins!

Stock mud flap vs. Competition Werkes fender eliminator. Yes, Comp Werkes eliminator wins!

Tools I used: 4mm allen T-wrench, 10mm and 14mm ratchet wrenches, cutters, pliers, wire crimpers (one automotive, one metric-specific)

Tools I used: 4mm allen T-wrench, 10mm and 14mm ratchet wrenches, cutters, pliers, wire crimpers (one automotive, one metric-specific) and electrical tape

The Competition Werkes fender eliminator kit for the 2013-2014 Ninja 300R includes the CNC laser cut license plate holder made from 304 stainless steel as well as short stalk turn signals and an LED license light. The entire kit is feather light compared to the heavy weight mud flap the bike is equipped with at the factory. You can purchase this kit from any Competition Werkes dealer at an m.s.r.p. of $119.95.

Competition Werkes is an aftermarket motorcycle accessories and parts company that has been producing fender eliminator kits, exhausts and parts for motorcycles since 1984. To find out more about their products, click here.

Here is how the Ninja Turtle looks with the Competition Werkes exhaust and fender eliminator kit installed. Stay tuned as the transformation resumes!

Here is how the Ninja Turtle looks with the Competition Werkes exhaust and fender eliminator kit installed. Stay tuned as the transformation resumes!

Advertisements

Competition Werkes GP Slip-On Exhaust System for the Ninja 300R

There is nothing like the rumble of an aftermarket exhaust while decelerating into a corner. If you’re going to build a streetfighter, you need a sound to match the look; something that gives the bike a loud, in-your-face persona and  makes people stare as you ride down the street.

In 2013, Competition Werkes developed the GP shorty slip-on exhaust system for the Ninja 300 that transforms the bike’s passive thrum into a race bike’s growl. The system produces a little more bottom end grunt to gives you a snappier feel at the throttle and leaves an inevitable grin on your face.

The system is hand crafted from 304 stainless steel and has a tapered baffle for “improved performance and advanced tuning.” The canister is small and compact giving the bike a lighter, tighter feel without sacrificing styling. We installed the stainless steel GP system on our Ninja 300R Streetfighter project bike and here’s how we did it.

Step 1:

Make sure you have all the hardware and clamps needed to install the system.

The GP exhaust system comes with the muffler, high shield, 4mm allen bolt, pipe clamp and sticker.

The GP exhaust system comes with the muffler, high shield, 4mm allen bolt, pipe clamp and sticker.

Step 2:

To remove the heat shield from the stock exhaust can, remove the 5mm allen bolt and the clamp on the mid pipe with a Phillips screwdriver.

Remove the 5mm allen bolt.

Remove the 5mm allen bolt.

Loosen the bottom clamp with the Phillips screwdriver.

Loosen the bottom clamp with the Phillips screwdriver.

Step 3:

Pull the bottom clamp on the mid pipe down or toward the front of the motorcycle, then pull the heat shield toward the front of the motorcycle to remove it.

Pull the bottom hose clamp down the mid pipe, then slide the heat shield forward (toward the front of the bike) to remove it.

Pull the bottom hose clamp down the mid pipe, then slide the heat shield forward (toward the front of the bike) to remove it.

Step 4:

To remove the stock exhaust can, loosen the clamp around the muffler with a 12mm socket or T-handle.

IMG_1672

Step 5:

Remove the 14mm bolt and nut from the rear set.

IMG_1668

Step 6:

Pull the exhaust toward the rear of the motorcycle.

IMG_1680

Notice how the stock exhaust has a muffler gasket while the Werkes USA exhaust does not. This is because the Werkes USA exhaust muffler slides forward onto the midpipe until the bolt hole for the heat shield is just forward of the rear set heel guard bolts. The Werkes USA exhaust does not need an exhaust gasket!

Stock (left), Werkes USA (right)

Stock (left), Werkes USA (right)

Step 7:

Remember to slide the Werkes USA clamp onto the mid pipe before sliding on the Werkes USA canister onto the midpipe.

IMG_1715

Put a rag over the swing arm to avoid scratching or denting the Werkes USA canister while wiggling or sliding it over the mid pipe. Note: It is a tight fit, so it takes a little body English.

IMG_1728

Clean the Werkes USA exhaust thoroughly on the outside with WD-40 or comparable cleaning substance to avoid discoloring the canister after starting the motorcycle.

Step 8:

Tighten the hose clamp. Install the new stainless steel heat shield with the 4mm allen bolt provided.

IMG_1740

Final Step:

Make sure you clean the outside of the pipe with WD-40 or a comparable product before running the motorcycle to avoid discoloration.

Start and enjoy.

Tools I used: 3/8’’ ratchet with 14mm and 12mm sockets, Phillips screwdriver, 12mm T-handle, 14mm wrench 4mm/5mm T-allen wrenches

Tools I used: 3/8’’ ratchet with 14mm and 12mm sockets, Phillips screwdriver, 12mm T-handle, 14mm wrench
4mm/5mm T-allen wrenches

We put each exhaust system (both stock and the Werkes USA muffler) on the scale. The stock exhaust weighs 17.5 lbs. while the Werkes U.S.A. exhaust weighs 2.5 lbs. This is a total weight savings of 15 pounds!

We put each exhaust system (both stock and the Werkes USA muffler) on the scale. The stock exhaust weighs 17.5 lbs. while the Werkes U.S.A. exhaust weighs 2.5 lbs.
This is a total weight savings of 15 pounds!

You can purchase the GP slip-on exhaust for an m.s.r.p. of $399.95. The exhaust is also available in Carbon Fiber, Cobra Black, Cobalt Black, Tungsten, Titanium, Mag Silver, Satin Silver and Gold for $100 more, as well as Black Velvet for $50 more. The install takes roughly ten minutes and is very easy. With the Competition Werkes GP exhaust, you’ll be where on your way to a lighter, faster and better-sounding machine in no time!

Competition Werkes is an aftermarket motorcycle accessories and parts company that has been producing fender eliminator kits, exhausts and much more for motorcycles since 1984. To find out more about their products, click here.

MotoInked’s 2013 Kawasaki Ninja 300R Streetfighter Build

Say goodbye to this stock body because it's about to mutate into a bad ass fighter!

Say goodbye to this stock body because it’s about to mutate into a bad ass fighter!

Ever since the Ninja Turtles hit TV in the late 80’s, I was a kid infatuated with green things that were fun, bad ass and entertaining. Hence my affinity for Ninjas, big and small. You say Kawasaki, I say “Kawabunga!”

Michael Angelo was always my favorite turtle and it’s because of him I’ve never forgotten to appreciate the little things, no matter how underestimated they are. I say “underestimated” for a reason. You can never presume to be born with bad ass-ness, it has to be earned…or built.

This is why Michael Angelo is a muse for transforming my 2013 Kawasaki Ninja 300 into a Kawabunga streetfighter. Just like radioactive waste turned a slow, harmless turtle into a lightning quick ninja warrior, I’m going to turn my slow Ninja 300 into the envy of his bigger brothers.

I’ve scoured forums for other owners who have made the leap from clothed to naked with their 300’s but the most I’ve found that even resembled a transformation was a 250 that was smacked in the face with a 636 front end. I was disappointed to see an almost unanimous opinion across the inter webs that stripping and revamping a new 300 made about as much sense as giving a teenager a face lift. Why waste your time chopping up a new bike when you can do the same to an older, salvaged one?

You know what my answer to that one is? Because it’s already been done before! What’s the point in having a motorcycle, new or old, if you can’t make it your own, if you can’t transform it into the machine you’ve wanted since you were a kid? Why do I have to stick to the conventional, cookie-cutter showroom floor lawnmower-sounding half pint with the pretty green dress on? Why can’t I use my superpowers to turn my little ninja into the Michael Angelo I always envied as a kid? Why can’t I make my tortoise slap that silly hare on the ass? We live in America because this is the land where the naysayers can kiss my lilly white waste gate. This is the place where the haters can shout at their computer screens while I plaster my Kawa-bunga 300 turned bad ass street fighter photos all over their precious forums as shamelessly as a garage rapper peddling demos in a Wal Mart. This is my chance to turn a short woman complex into an excuse to go bigger and better than ever before.

Welcome to my adventure, ladies and gentlemen. We’re about to embark on a journey where David sends Goliath crying home to his mama. As you see it now, my little Ninja Turtle is still pretty much bone stock. He’s a ready volunteer on the surgery table and he’s ready to become a nun chuck wielding road warrior.

If you want the bully to run, you can’t stare him down from the bottom up. You have to tighten that ass and add some much needed oomph to that growl. Our first step will be to get the turtle out the gate with the pop of a new exhaust and whip that tail into shape with a Competition Werkes USA stainless steel GP slip-on exhaust and fender eliminator kit. Want to know how you turn an elephant man in a Beckham? Then get your ass back here to learn a thing or two about the installs. Stay tuned.