Suzuki GSX-R600/750/1000 Throttle Adjustment

I had a friend ask me about a high idle problem she was having once her 2007 Suzuki GSX-R600 was warm after a long ride. She said the r.p.m.’s would climb to nearly 2,000, then drop down once the motor cooled off. I’m familiar with this problem, as the 2005 Suzuki GSX-R1000 I’ve been riding was having a rough, low idle problem and would stall when cold. I corrected the idle, increasing the idle r.p.m.’s with the idle adjustment screw from 1,200 r.p.m’s to 1,500 r.p.m.’s, but the bike would still stall when cold then rev high when warm.

I then checked the valve clearances to the camshafts with a feeler gauge to make sure they weren’t too tight, as tight clearance from the tip of the valve stems to the cam shafts in the top end of the motor can cause stalling issues on higher mileage bikes. The clearances were all within factory specification, so I started up the bike and played with the fast idle screw, which is the smaller screw just underneath the idle adjustment screw on the throttle body. This screw controls the clearance between the arm (holding the throttle cables) and the larger idle adjustment screw.

There I found if I adjusted the fast idle screw too far up toward the arm thus creating a tight clearance between the two, it solved my rough idle issue but the r.p.m.’s would be too high once the bike was warm. Now that I knew I compensated too much, I adjusted the fast idle screw out so as to have a little bit of slack between the screw and the arm. With the bike running, I then rotated the larger idle adjustment in (toward the air box) and was able to solve both the rough idle problem and the high idle problem when the bike was warm. It was just a matter of getting the fast idle screw adjusted correctly before rotating the larger idle adjustment screw in or out.

The factory does not recommend messing with the fast idle screw, but if you are having a high idle problem, this can act as a band aid until you’re able to synch the throttle bodies during the next service. All you need is a 4mm or 5mm T-allen to remove the seat and gas tank and a phillips head screw driver (with a small butt handle, no bigger than your pinky finger) to adjust the screws. When you adjust the fast idle screw, you want just a little bit of slack between the screw and the arm. I learned this from the Kawasaki Team Green mechanics as they used to adjust the same type of screw inside the carburetor to sharpen throttle response on the KX250’s.

This is by far not a precise or factory recommended explanation, but it has worked for me.

The throttle body is located underneath the gas tank and air box, the idle adjustment screws are located on the left side or clutch side of the motorcycle.

The throttle body is located underneath the gas tank and air box, the idle adjustment screws are located on the left side or clutch side of the motorcycle.

 

The arm rests on the smaller fast idle screw. You want to adjust the smaller fast idle screw so that the arm has a little bit of slack before throttle sleeve engagement and rests softly on the larger idle screw. This takes a little bit of trial and error to get the right balance, but the end result is worth it.

The arm rests on the smaller fast idle screw. You want to adjust the smaller fast idle screw so that the arm has a little bit of slack before throttle sleeve engagement and rests softly on the larger idle screw. This takes a little bit of trial and error to get the right balance, but the end result is worth it.

 

Second Ladies Can Wrench Seminar scheduled for February 2, 2013.

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The second Ladies Can Wrench seminar will take place from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. on February 2nd, 2013 at M1 Sportriders, a sportbike oriented service, parts and accessories shop owned by Jenn and Pete Jaynes, in La Habra, CA. The address is 345 West Whittier Blvd., La Habra, CA, 90631.

This seminar will be more hands on than the last one. We will be doing oil changes, as well as cleaning, adjusting and lubing the chain. We will be able to work on three bikes at a time, so be prepared to get your hands dirty. We will get to as many bikes as we can within the three hour time frame, but EVERYONE will get a chance to turn a wrench.

Oil, oil filters, chain lube and chain cleaner will all be available for purchase at M1 the day of the seminar. Details of pricing are TBD. For this seminar, bring your bike, work gloves, and wear clothes you don’t mind getting dirty. See you there!

Again, this seminar is meant for women who have never worked on bikes before and the pace will be slowed down so everyone can get something out of the workshop. Please forward this invite to anyone you think might be interested.

Click here to view the Facebook invite.

Do you need a motorcycle mechanic or help with working on your motorcycle?

If you need maintenance done to your dirt bikes, ATV’s, Side by Side’s or metric motorcycles, please let me know. I’m going to be doing a lot more work out of my garage. I have the tools to work on any motorcycles or off road vehicles made by Japanese and European manufacturers. Though I do not currently have the standard tools for Harley motorcycles.

Even if you’d like to learn how to work on your bike yourself, bring it over and we can work on it together. I have a pick-up truck and can come get the vehicle from you if needed. I currently live in the Inland Empire in Chino, CA. Please email me at motoinked@gmail.com if you’re interested in having work done.

Mechanic’s name: Rachael Maltbie

Former Super Streetbike magazine editor

Motorcycle Mechanic’s Institute graduate

Six years of field and shop experience

Former employee of Kawasaki Motors Corp. U.S.A with the Public Relations and Technical Services departments. I’ve been involved with prepping media units, recall repairs, as well as Quality Assurance and R&D testing.

Tasks I am proficient in handling:

Oil changes

Coolant flushes

Fork seal and oil changes

Carburetor cleaning

Throttle body and carburetor synchronization

Valve adjustments

Head gasket changes

Electrical repair and diagnosis

Tire changes

Aftermarket parts installation

Track prep including track fairing repair, safety wiring, coolant swap, setting sag

Chain and sprockets swaps and upkeep

Air filter cleaning and replacement

 

If we find we need parts to get the job done, I’ll order them through M1 Sportriders, based in La Habra, CA.

 

Motorcycle maintenance seminars for women, starting January 13th, 2013.

Rachael Maltbie and Jenn Jaynes installing GKA Industries parts for ladymoto.com at M1 Sportriders in La Habra.

Rachael Maltbie and Jenn Jaynes installing GKA Industries parts for ladymoto.com at M1 Sportriders in La Habra.

ATTN all lady riders!

Where: 2013 South Ritchey, Santa Ana, CA 92705

When: January 13, 2012 from 3:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

What to bring: Your bike, notepad/pen

From Jeff Hawkins of Skillz Days:

“We’re putting on our first mechanical seminar on January 13th in Santa Ana from 3:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. This is specifically for women. If you can wrench yourself away from everything else, you’ll be welcome. We’ll be covering quite a bit about the necessary tools and their use. It’s guaranteed to ratchet up everyone’s knowledge about how to find and fix problems. To make you comfortable, we’ll also show you how to make ergonomic adjustments to your machine. I’ll be posting the address soon.”

Jeff and I will be leading these seminars. We’ll start from the basics and progress to the more involved maintenance tasks throughout following seminars, depending on interest. The point of these seminars is to familiarize women with their motorcycles so they can do most of the maintenance on their own or if they take their bike to a dealer, they’ll be able to pin point issues for the service writer, preventing unwarranted dealer costs.

Please r.s.v.p if you plan on attending to motoinked@gmail.com or skillzdays@yahoo.com.

Hope to see you ladies there!